Hardware Organization Day 2

I was working in my virtual machine lab most of the day today for a work project, so I didn’t spend much time on the wings.  There really isn’t much left on the hardware organization, and I think I have it all finished up tonight.

I started out by putting all the plastic snap bushings into one of the medium harbor freight cases to keep them sorted.  There is still a bit of room in this case, but I’m sure I’ll find some use for it.  Next up, I studied the plans for the aileron assembly and compared them to the detailed instructions in the aileron sub-kit.  I also studied the plans for Service Bulletin SB 16-03-28 so that I could try and organize these parts too.  It appears that all those parts are related to mounting the ailerons, so I stuck all the parts into one of the larger harbor freight cases and labeled them to be ready for when I get to them.

The rest of the time. I spent looking over the plans and just getting ready for the build.  I am excited about getting back to building!  No photos from tonight, since there really wasn’t much going on.

Hardware Organization

I spent A LOT of time organizing all the hardware and small parts today.  I saw a video by Adam Savage talking about his hardware rig from Sortimo, but those things are very expensive.  Further research shows that Harbor Freight has a cheaper copy that should do the job just fine.  I ended up buying several of these medium size cases and a few of these larger sized ones.

The first step was sorting out all the bolts, nuts and washers.  I wanted to put them into the same case since they are typically pulled for use at the same time.  I was actually able to fit all of the nuts, bolts, washers, screws and some other bits into one case!

In another medium case, I stuck all the nutplates and blind rivets.  I ended up keeping them in their plastic baggies, to help them from migrating into each other.  I am going to purchase some little baggies for my nut and bolt case for this same reason.  The cases do a decent job of keeping stuff separate, but those little thin washers are hard to control!

For all the other small bits and pieces, I used a medium case and a large case.  I was able to fit about 90% of these small parts in the cases, so it’ll make it easy to keep track of them until I need them.

For the rivets, I decided to reuse the Husky wall mount parts organizer that I used in my tail kit.  I really like being able to pull the draw out containing the rivet size I needed and carry to my work bench.  Keeping the rivets in their baggies helps to prevent accidents and hours of picking up rivets.  The wing has a lot more different sizes of rivets in both AN470 and AN426 versions.  I consolidated all the left-over rivets from the tail kit with the ones from the wing kit and they all fit in the husky wall mount:

At the end of the day, this all seems like a very small amount of work done for over 6 hours of labor, but a lot of time was spent counting, sorting and consolidating hundreds upon hundreds of nuts, bolts, washers, screws, rivets, etc.   I am not completely done just yet either.  I still have to sort out the bushings and the aileron mount sub-kit and think of what I want to do with the SB sub kit.  Since its related to the ailerons, I will probably consolidate them into one case.  I’ll work on them tomorrow, 6+ hours of sorting is enough for one day 🙂

Here’s all the photos:

Google Photos Link: https://goo.gl/photos/YVEDbLxjz5DE22rb6

Hours Worked: 6.5

 

Wing Inventory Day 1

Tonight was inventory time.  I was able to get about 90% of the inventory completed, with only a few bits of the smaller bags of hardware left.  I still need to come up with some sort of organization for all these bits of hardware and small pieces of kit.  Surprisingly, it looks like the only thing that was left out of my kit was the pre-fabbed fuel pickup tube w/screen.  The flop tube for the other tank was shipped, but I think they forgot to toss in the other fuel pickup I ordered extra.  It’s only about $16.50, so I am hoping Van’s doesn’t give me a hard time about sending it to me.  I’ll hold off on reporting it until I get all these other little hardware bags done since its possible it could be tucked in there somewhere.

I uncrated all the parts in the garage, so I moved them over to the shop as I counted them off on the inventory.  I made sure that as I checked the off my list I did a thorough inspection for damage.  So far, everything is looking great.  A testament to how well Van’s crates these things up.   The first things I inventoried were the fiberglass wingtips and landing light lenses.  I wanted to put them on the top shelf with the tail kit fiberglass parts so they would be protected from shop damage.  Everything fit nicely on the top shelf:

The next things I wanted to tackle was the longerons and other long bits of aluminum angle.  The wings ship with two 15′ pieces of angle used for the longerons.  I actually added an additional 2 longerons to be safe, and there is also two 12′ and two 9′ pieces of angle that we wont use until the fuselage.  So, I decided the safest place for these things were in the rafters of my shop, that way they’d be tucked up and out of the way and could lay flat.  I also added a piece of 2×4 between the two longest rafters to help give the aluminum angle some more support, and I am pretty happy with it:

I also ordered several other pieces of angle aluminum that was hard to find at the local shops, and the wings ship with some other long bits of metal, like the piano hinges that need to be store flat and safe.  I also ordered 6 extra 6′ lengths of piano hinge to mount my wing tips, so I had to think of something.  Luckily, I had some utility hooks laying around that were looking for a job, and they seemed like they would suit the purpose….so to work they went:

The rest of the parts, I just neatly tucked away on my shelves with their part number stickers facing up.  I tried to organize them by their section (ailerons, flaps, tanks, etc) so that all the parts are there together.  Once I have my shop all inventoried and the wing stands mounted, I’ll likely reposition the shelves anyways.  For now, I just used the shelves as the place to put parts that were inspected and inventoried.  After about 3.5 hours of work, I decided to call it quits.  I still have to inventory the parts in the aileron mounting bag, the stall warner bag and the SB bag, so I took them upstairs to work on the kitchen table for that.  I’m going to think up some sort of organization system for all this small hardware to make it easier to stow and grab when needed.

Heres the album for tonights work:

Link to Google Photos Album: https://goo.gl/photos/zGDHwqXryWArQn3z7

Hours Worked: 3.5

Wing Delivery Day!

WOOHOO!!! My wings are FINALLY sitting in my garage, waiting to be unpacked.   It started yesterday with a call from ABF Freight telling me my wings were ready for pickup at the terminal.  I decided to pick the up to save money, and because ABF didn’t offer liftgate service which would have made delivery very difficult at my house.  So I just went and picked them up and my friend Randy helped me unload them.

The ABF terminal is only about 20 minutes from my house, so I was able to swing by and pick them up pretty easily.  The charges for freight were around $315, so not to bad for 4 business day delivery!

Just in case any readers are wondering what to expect with their RV-7 wings, here is the crate dimensions:

Crate one:
186″ x 12″ x 12″
Weight: 220 Lbs.

Crate two:
96″ x 32″ x 12″
Weight: 214 Lbs.

They were pretty well packaged, and very little shipping damage.  The fattest crate had one of skids missing, but it looked undamaged otherwise.  I took plenty of photos after the ABF guys loaded them, just in case I need to make a claim.  Unloading wasn’t too bad, we slid the crates gently down a loading ramp and right into the garage, so we didn’t really have to do any heavy lifting.  But, if you needed to lift and carry these crates, 4 adults would be great.  You could probably do it with 2 or three strong guys, but 4 average strength guys it would be no problem.

This is a short post, I’ll be headed down to open the crates and start the inventory and storing process in a few minutes.  That will be another post on its own.

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Google Photos Link:

 

Hours Worked: 2